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Cellar Spider

Cellar-Spider

The cellar spider is commonly referred to as “daddy-long-legs” because of their very long, thin legs, and as their name implies, are found in dark and damp places like cellars and basements. The cellar spider seems to fare better in areas with higher relative humidity. Unlike other spider species, cellar spiders prefer to live within close proximity to one another, creating troublesome communities within human dwellings. These spiders build loose, irregular, tangled webs in corners, and hang upside down on the underside of them. The webs are not cleaned but rather new webs are continually added. This habit can result in extensive webbing in a relatively short time. When disturbed on its web, the cellar spider has the habit of rapidly shaking its body in a rotary movement to confuse and entangle the prey. Like most other spiders, cellar spiders are highly adaptive and successful predators. Their diet consists primarily of insects, which they lure and trap within their webs before encasing them in cocoons. When food supplies in their environment are insufficient, these spiders travel to other webs and pretend to be trapped insects. As the other spider attempts to catch and consume it, the cellar spider attacks the unsuspecting arachnid. They prefer to eat small moths, flies, mosquitoes and other insects or spiders that are found near their webs. Cellar spiders and their webs are usually found in dark and damp places, such as cellars, basements, and crawl spaces. They can also be found in the corners of garages, sheds, and warehouses, on eaves, windows and ceilings, and in closets, sink cabinets and bath-traps. Although, cellar spiders do possess fangs and there is a legend that they have the most potent venom of any spider, the length of these fangs are too short to penetrate human skin, therefore they are harmless to us.